(Source: gyllenhawl, via ellisbender)

a-bittersweet-life:

image

Richard Linklater is a great example for emerging filmmakers and experienced ones alike. His own story in filmmaking shows beyond doubt that as long as the filmmaker follows his or her own personal path with purposefulness and a love and yearning to become more aware of the art form,…

a-bittersweet-life:

Boyhood, directed by Richard Linklater.

(via ellisbender)

jean-luc-gohard:

You know how sensitive white people are? George W. Bush said Kanye West saying he doesn’t care about black people was the lowest point in his presidency. He thought being called a racist was worse than 9/11.

You’re the smartest guy I ever met, and you’re too stupid to see…

(Source: suchasadaffair, via ellisbender)

thefilmstage:


I can’t wait to see what will go on between couples at dinner after they see the movie. There are so many interesting tectonic shifts. When the people I’ve shown the movie come out of it, they are either Team Amy or Team Nick. Team Amy doesn’t have a single quibble about her behavior, and Team Nick doesn’t have any problems with his. Then there are people who primarily measure it against the book and how they felt about the characters in the book. And the narrative of the movie is vastly denuded from the way it’s allowed to grow and bloom in the novel. It wasn’t a defoliation as much as a deforestation. Once you got it back to the branches and the trunk, it was pretty easy to see that this movie was going to be about who we are and who we present to those we are endeavoring to seduce. And the absurdity of that difference needed to be part of the two-and-a-half-hour fabric in a much bigger way than in the novel. For me, the 30 percent of the novel that’s about who we present—our narcissistic façades—becomes the entire foundation of the movie.
When we started working together, the biggest concern was how we would represent the two voices. Gillian [Flynn] quickly adapted to the structure that the “she said” is in flashback and the “he said” is being lived out in front of you. And you question which one is reliable or if either of them are. When we pruned back, Amy’s “cool girl” speech becomes central to the exploration of “we’ve been married five years now and I can’t get it up any more to be that person you were initially attracted to and I’m exhausted by it and I’m resentful that you still expect this.” And you throw in a little homicidal rage and it’s a fairly combustible idea. Does that make sense? [Much laughter] I’m so sorry I made this movie: it’s just not marketable.

David Fincher discusses the structure of Gone Girl.

thefilmstage:

I can’t wait to see what will go on between couples at dinner after they see the movie. There are so many interesting tectonic shifts. When the people I’ve shown the movie come out of it, they are either Team Amy or Team Nick. Team Amy doesn’t have a single quibble about her behavior, and Team Nick doesn’t have any problems with his. Then there are people who primarily measure it against the book and how they felt about the characters in the book. And the narrative of the movie is vastly denuded from the way it’s allowed to grow and bloom in the novel. It wasn’t a defoliation as much as a deforestation. Once you got it back to the branches and the trunk, it was pretty easy to see that this movie was going to be about who we are and who we present to those we are endeavoring to seduce. And the absurdity of that difference needed to be part of the two-and-a-half-hour fabric in a much bigger way than in the novel. For me, the 30 percent of the novel that’s about who we present—our narcissistic façades—becomes the entire foundation of the movie.

When we started working together, the biggest concern was how we would represent the two voices. Gillian [Flynn] quickly adapted to the structure that the “she said” is in flashback and the “he said” is being lived out in front of you. And you question which one is reliable or if either of them are. When we pruned back, Amy’s “cool girl” speech becomes central to the exploration of “we’ve been married five years now and I can’t get it up any more to be that person you were initially attracted to and I’m exhausted by it and I’m resentful that you still expect this.” And you throw in a little homicidal rage and it’s a fairly combustible idea. Does that make sense? [Much laughter] I’m so sorry I made this movie: it’s just not marketable.

David Fincher discusses the structure of Gone Girl.

(via davidfincher)

(Source: paul-stine, via chibstelford)


Alfred Hitchcock with a dog, 1956.
Alfred Hitchcock with a dog, 1956.

(Source: mattybing1025, via andreii-tarkovsky)

sams-film-stills:

Her (2013) Dir. Spike Jonze 

(via sams-film-stills)

sams-film-stills:

Inside Llewyn Davis (2014) Dirs. The Coen Brothers

(via sams-film-stills)

(Source: allen-bergman)

ittakestimetodonothing:

Jules and Jim (1962)
Dir. François Truffaut

ittakestimetodonothing:

Jules and Jim (1962)

Dir. François Truffaut

(Source: flickr.com)

a-bittersweet-life:

When I was a critic, I thought that a successful film had simultaneously to express an idea of the world and an idea of cinema…Today, I demand that a film express either the joy of making cinema or the agony of making cinema. I am not at all interested in anything in between; I am not interested in all those films that do not pulse.
François Truffaut

a-bittersweet-life:

When I was a critic, I thought that a successful film had simultaneously to express an idea of the world and an idea of cinema…Today, I demand that a film express either the joy of making cinema or the agony of making cinema. I am not at all interested in anything in between; I am not interested in all those films that do not pulse.

François Truffaut

norma-shearer:

Jules et Jim (1962) Jeanne Moreau

(Source: gloriaswanson)